Virtual Memories Show 433:
Darryl Cunningham

“I’m critical of the super-wealthy, but not that critical of capitalism. It’s not wrong, but it needs restructuring to serve as many people as possible, and not be a way for the super-wealthy to siphon off as much as possible.”

With the new edition of Billionaires: The Lives of the Rich an Powerful (Drawn & Quarterly), cartoonist Darryl Cunningham explores the lives and businesses of Rupert Murdoch, the Koch Brothers, and Jeff Bezos to understand how they built their wealth and warped the lives of the rest of us in the process. Darryl talks about the genesis of Billionaires and its roots in his earlier work on the 2008 financial crisis, and why this book won’t (necessarily) turn you into a communist. We get into his roots as a cartoonist, how a failed branch of his career made him a better writer and researcher, why getting technically better creates its own set of problems, and the comics that first inspired him. We also discuss his upcoming book on Putin & Russia, and whether the trolls and bots that might come after him online will be tougher than the homeopaths and chiropractors who got mad at his book on science denial. Plus, we talk about his new work with the NHS and why he’s trying to avoid doing books on Brexit or Trump. Give it a listen! And go read Billionaires!

Enjoy the conversation! Then check out the archives for more great episodes!

Lots of ways to follow The Virtual Memories Show! iTunes, Spotify, Twitter, Instagram, YouTube, TuneIn, Tumblr, and RSS!

About our Guest

Darryl Cunningham is the cartoonist of five non-fiction books, including Supercrash: How to Hijack the Global Economy, and Billionaires. His comics explore subjects as diverse as mental health, science, economics, and politics. Darryl has given talks at the London School of Economics and the City of Arts and Lights, Valencia. In 2015 he was one of 30 world-renowned photographers, painters, sculptors, writers, filmmakers and musicians who were invited to contribute to the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation’s Art of Saving a Life project, to promote vaccination in the developing world. In 2018 he was awarded an Honorary Degree of Master of Arts from Leeds Arts University. He lives in the United Kingdom.

Follow Darryl on Twitter, and Instagram and support his work through Patreon.

Credits: This episode’s music is Fella by Hal Mayforth, used with permission from the artist. The conversation was recorded remotely via Zencastr. I used a Heil PR-40 Dynamic Studio Recording Microphone feeding into a Cloudlifter CL-1 and a Mackie Onyx Blackjack 2×2 USB Recording Interface. All processing and editing done in Adobe Audition CC. Photo of Darryl by someone else. It’s on my instagram.

Virtual Memories Show 432:
Shary Flenniken

“Being at National Lampoon was just like hanging out with your friends. In a way, my whole career has been like that: hanging out and doing cartoons.”

Legendary cartoonist & humorist Shary Flenniken joins the show to celebrate the long overdue collection of her amazing Trots & Bonnie comics (New York Review Comics). We get into her process of selecting the strips from Trots & Bonnie’s ~20-year run at National Lampoon, her realization of how funny her comics still are, the joy of seeing the restored artwork, and the fun of providing annotations for each of the strips. We talk about her time among the Air Pirates, the great advice she got from Charles Vess, what she learned during her stint as an editor at National Lampoon, the importance of Kermode’s The Sense Of An Ending and the challenge of a punchline, the impact of her comics on their intended and unintended audiences, and whether she considers her art’s place in the history of underground comics. We also discuss our dogs, her lifelong love of popular fiction, her new comics work, her favorite pen nib and her shift to digital art, and a whole lot more. Give it a listen! And go read Trots & Bonnie!

“The best artists, what they do for the world is make you see it differently.”

“It’s weird now, so many decades on from when I started, to look back and see what my opinions were back then. Sometimes it’s not fun; there are a couple of strips I left out of the book that were fine back then, but in today’s context. . . .”

Enjoy the conversation! Then check out the archives for more great episodes!

Lots of ways to follow The Virtual Memories Show! iTunes, Spotify, Twitter, Instagram, YouTube, TuneIn, Tumblr, and RSS!

About our Guest

Shary Flenniken is a cartoonist, writer, and editor. Her work has appeared in a variety of books and magazines including The American Bystander, Graphic Classics, and Drunk Stoned Brilliant Dead: The Writers and Artists Who Made the National Lampoon Insanely Great. After living and working in San Francisco, Los Angeles, the Florida Keys, and New York, she now resides where she grew up, in the Magnolia neighborhood of Seattle, WA. Shary holds degrees in commercial art, computer technology, web design, and professional technical education and instructional design. She loves post-apocalyptic science fiction, the artist Charles M. Russell, and walking her dogs. Her new book is Trots & Bonnie.

Follow Shary on Twitter and Instagram. And check out her alternate site, Slave To Her Pets.

Credits: This episode’s music is Fella by Hal Mayforth, used with permission from the artist. The conversation was recorded remotely via Zencastr. I used a Heil PR-40 Dynamic Studio Recording Microphone feeding into a Cloudlifter CL-1 and a Mackie Onyx Blackjack 2×2 USB Recording Interface. All processing and editing done in Adobe Audition CC. Photo of Shary by someone else.

Virtual Memories Show 429:
Nate Powell

“It was a lifesaver, having Congressman Lewis in my life during this period — his temperance, his playing the long game, his absolute lack of compromise on a moral and ethical level — a lot of this helped me on a personal basis.”

How will we remember (and recover from) the last 5 years? National Book Award-winning cartoonist Nate Powell‘s new collection, Save It For Later: Promises, Parenthood, and the Urgency of Protest (Abrams ComicArts) explores America’s fractures and its hopes for the future. We talk about the impetus of the book, how it follows his work adapting Rep. John Lewis‘ story in the MARCH trilogy, and how his conversations with the late congressman scared him even more about the impact of the previous presidential administration. We get into the Save It For Later‘s balancing act of memoir & essay, his decision to draw his kids as magical animals, what MARCH taught him about comics storytelling and how it influenced his recent work. We also discuss the irony of Gen X’s apolitical nature, Nate’s punk ethos, the combo of thrash metal & X-Men comics that instilled a social conscience in him, the delight of visiting the quarter bins in his childhood comic shop when he goes home, why not being an activist doesn’t equal being a defeatist, and a lot more. Give it a listen! And go read Save It For Later!

“The older I get, the more I feel that my generation is more strongly linked to the Baby Boomers than to Millennials, specifically by the erroneous assumption of the inevitability of social progress, by the privilege of assuming that things will naturally work out.”

APPLE PLAYER TK

“It’s not wrong that parents generally lose a lot of bandwidth to get involved with a lot of other work.”

Enjoy the conversation! Then check out the archives for more great episodes!

Lots of ways to follow The Virtual Memories Show! iTunes, Spotify, Twitter, Instagram, YouTube, TuneIn, Tumblr, and RSS!

About our Guest

Nate Powell is a National Book Award–winning cartoonist whose work includes civil rights icon John Lewis’s historic March trilogy, Come Again, Two Dead, Any Empire, Swallow Me Whole, and The Silence of Our Friends. Nate has also received the Robert F. Kennedy Book Award, three Eisner Awards, the Michael L. Printz Award, the Comic-Con International Inkpot Award, two Ignatz Awards, and the Walter Dean Myers Award. He has discussed his work at the United Nations, on MSNBC’s The Rachel Maddow Show, PBS, CNN, and Free Speech TV. He lives in Bloomington, Indiana. His new book is Save It For Later.

Follow Nate on Twitter and Instagram.

Credits: This episode’s music is Fella by Hal Mayforth, used with permission from the artist. The conversation was recorded remotely via Zencastr. I used a Heil PR-40 Dynamic Studio Recording Microphone feeding into a Cloudlifter CL-1 and a Mackie Onyx Blackjack 2×2 USB Recording Interface. All processing and editing done in Adobe Audition CC. Photo of Nate by Ben Rains.

Virtual Memories Show 428:
Michael DeForge

I think one of the ways art can be politically useful is by reimagining different ways of being.”

Cartoonist Michael DeForge joins the show to celebrate his amazing new graphic story collection, Heaven No Hell (Drawn & Quarterly). We get into his prolific comics career, his compulsion to jump genres, the ways we relitigate the traumas of our lives, and why he digs he self-imposed challenge of a daily comic strip (on top of his other comics and his illustration work). We get into how revolutionary politics permeates his art and how he engages in community activism, what it means to rethink our relationship to social media, why technology will always outpace his attempts at ridiculing it, and why Reading The Comments led him to explore a creative path when he was making Leaving Richard’s Valley. We also discuss the uses of absurdism & satire, how his dystopian stories have him rooting for utopian ideas, how he bullied his way into judging butter tart competitions, and more. Give it a listen! And go read Heaven No Hell and check out Birds of Maine!

“We take for granted that technology is developing in a certain way, and it’s up to us to mitigate the damage. I don’t think that’s true, and my current work is about an alternate view of technology.”

“I feel like my comics are still so far away from where I want them to be that I’m committed to continuing to focus on this medium.”

Enjoy the conversation! Then check out the archives for more great episodes!

Lots of ways to follow The Virtual Memories Show! iTunes, Spotify, Twitter, Instagram, YouTube, TuneIn, Tumblr, and RSS!

About our Guest

Michael DeForge lives in Toronto, Ontario. His comics and illustrations have been featured in Jacobin, The New York Times, Bloomberg, The Believer, The Walrus, The New Yorker and Maisonneuve Magazine. He worked as a designer on Adventure Time for six seasons. His published books include Very Casual, A Body Beneath, Ant Colony, First Year Healthy, Dressing, Big Kids, Sticks Angelica, Folk Hero, Leaving Richard’s Valley, Familiar Face, and A Western World. His new book is Heaven No Hell.

Follow Michael on Twitter and Instagram and follow his current serial, Birds Of Maine, on Instagram.

Credits: This episode’s music is Fella by Hal Mayforth, used with permission from the artist. The conversation was recorded remotely via Zencastr. I used a Heil PR-40 Dynamic Studio Recording Microphone feeding into a Cloudlifter CL-1 and a Mackie Onyx Blackjack 2×2 USB Recording Interface. All processing and editing done in Adobe Audition CC. That pic of Michael is by Matthew James-Wilson.

Virtual Memories Show 427:
Kate Lacour

“The part of taxidermy that’s meaningful to me is my personal interest in interacting with physical bodies. There’s a lot of emotional weight and personal tickle involved.”

It’s been a year since I started the COVID Check-In series of podcasts, so I decided to return to the very first guest in that series, artist Kate Lacour, to celebrate! (You know what I mean.) We talk about how her life has changed over the course of a year in Pandemia, and how the urge to document those first few months gave way to other outlets. In her case, Kate rediscovered herself through taxidermy. We get into how she taught herself the rudiments of that art through YouTube and online groups, her philosophy of animals and bodies, the question of realism vs. subjectivity, and why New Orleans is an awfully good place to make a living as a taxidermist. We go deeper into what comics mean to her and how she may return to them, the post-pandemic trip she wants to take, what progress looks like in the sequence of animals she’s preserved, and more. Give it a listen! And go read Kate’s Vivisectionary!

(And listen to my first podcast with Kate and our COVID Check-In!)

“With the kids, I was in constant motion, so I was blessed to never have time to process those first few months.”

“I love being able to work from home, with my hands, in my own space/abattoir, which looks a bit like Texas Chainsaw, but it’s lovely and it’s my space. It’s been deeply life-changing.”

“I’m afraid of articulating visually something that’s important, but doing it poorly because I just wanted to get it out there, just wanted that gratification.”

Enjoy the conversation! Then check out the archives for more great episodes!

Lots of ways to follow The Virtual Memories Show! iTunes, Spotify, Twitter, Instagram, YouTube, TuneIn, Tumblr, and RSS!

About our Guest

Kate Lacour studied biology and psychology at the University of Chicago and Oberlin, and Art Therapy at the School of Visual Arts. She learned to draw through the Art Students’ League in New York City. Her art and comics are inspired by a love for the aesthetics of science and a fascination/revulsion towards bodies. Her book Vivisectionary was published by Fantagraphics in 2019. She is the winner of the 2016 Museum of Comics and Cartoon Art award, and has given art talks at the Society of Illustrators, American Art Therapy Conference, New Orleans Public Library, Antenna Gallery, Signals, and the Pharmacy Museum. Kate lives in New Orleans with her husband and three children.

Credits: This episode’s music is Fella by Hal Mayforth, used with permission from the artist. The conversation was recorded remotely via Zencastr. I used a Heil PR-40 Dynamic Studio Recording Microphone feeding into a Cloudlifter CL-1 and a Mackie Onyx Blackjack 2×2 USB Recording Interface. All processing and editing done in Adobe Audition CC. Photos by Kate. It’s on my instagram.