Virtual Memories Show 251:
Paul Karasik & Mark Newgarden

“Ernie Bushmiller used to say, ‘You gotta do the job right,’ and we took him at his word.”

How deep can deep reading go? Paul Karasik & Mark Newgarden talk about the 10-year project of exploring a single Nancy strip, for their new book How to Read Nancy: The Elements of Comics in Three Easy Panels (Fantagraphics). We get into the wonders of Ernie Bushmiller’s signature strip, the transformative class they took with filmmaker Ken Jacobs, the malfunctioning tape recorder that led to the whole project, the challenges of getting Jerry Lewis to write the book’s foreword, Nancy’s role as proto-feminist, and more! Plus, I get them to talk about the secret story of the first time they met, where their collecting impulse came from, the pleasure of finding a good flea market, Art Spiegelman’s strength as a teacher, how each of them teaches comics and how a lot of students have no sense of comics history, and how they keep the “ick” in “academic”! Give it a listen! And go buy How to Read Nancy!

“Nancy was a guilty pleasure when I was kid, if it even WAS a pleasure. There was something odd about the strip that gave me the creeps.”

Enjoy the conversation! Then check out the archives for more great episodes!

Lots of ways to follow The Virtual Memories Show! iTunes, Twitter, Instagram, Facebook, Tumblr, and RSS!

About our Guest

Paul Karasik is a cartoonist, editor, and teacher. His works include the graphic novel adaptation of Paul Auster’s City of Glass (with David Mazzucchelli) and The Ride Together: A Brother and Sister’s Memoir of Autism in the Family (with his sister Judy Karasik). He also edited the complete collection of Fletcher Hanks comics, Turn Loose Our Death Rays And Kill Them All. He lives in Martha’s Vineyard.

Mark Newgarden is an acclaimed cartoonist whose work was collected in We All Die Alone. He is also the the co-author (along with his partner, Megan Montague Cash) of Houghton Mifflin’s bestselling Bow Wow series of children’s books. He lives in Williamsburg, Brooklyn.

Credits: This episode’s music is Nothing’s Gonna Bring Me Down by David Baerwald, used with permission from the artist. The conversation was recorded at Mark Newgarden’s home on a pair of Blue enCORE 200 Microphones and a Blue enCORE 100 Microphone, all feeding into a Zoom H5 digital recorder. I recorded the intro and outro on a Heil PR-40 Dynamic Studio Recording Microphone feeding into a Cloudlifter CL-1 and a Mackie Onyx Blackjack 2×2 USB Recording Interface. All processing and editing done in Adobe Audition CC. Photo of Mr. Karasik & Mr. Newgarden by me. It’s on my instagram.

Virtual Memories Show 250:
Dave McKean

“Everything is in the words. Now matter how many pretty pictures I put in a comic, it’s never going to be worth anything without the words.”

Artist, writer, illustrator, cartoonist, designer, director, composer, and all-around creative force Dave McKean joins the show to talk about how the story dictates the medium, why comics-making shouldn’t be taught, the balancing act of collaborative and solo work, the missed opportunity of Tundra Publishing, his forays into theater and film with the WildWorks team and how they taught him to give up his control-freak nature, the influence of his jazz background, why it’s okay sometimes to judge a book by its cover, the problem-solving nature of a long walk, how the early loss of his father plays out in his work, his tendency to start every project with a complete failure of confidence, and the confluence of forces that led to his amazing new book, Black Dog: The Dreams of Paul Nash! Give it a listen! And go buy Black Dog!

“Up until about 12 years old, I thought comics just arrived on the newsstand from heaven or somewhere. I didn’t realize people made a living from doing these things.”

And what the heck: here’s a load of quotes from the episode:

“I can’t do a half a life. I have to spend all my time doing the things that I feel passionate about.”

“I fell in love with the process of not being in control.”

“I think I went into art school in love with the surface of things, and then realized how limited that is.”

“Record covers were like a little art gallery in your own home.”

“I felt like whoever wrote the Photoshop manual was writing it directly for me!”

“There’s a degree of inspiration in art, but I’m very interested in paying attention to what provokes that inspiration.”

Enjoy the conversation! Then check out the archives for more great episodes!

Lots of ways to follow The Virtual Memories Show! iTunes, Twitter, Instagram, Facebook, Tumblr, and RSS!

About our Guest

Dave McKean has illustrated many award-winning books and graphic novels, including The Magic of Reality (by Richard Dawkins), What’s Welsh for Zen: The Autobiography of John Cale, The Savage, Slog’s Dad, and Mouse Bird Snake Wolf (by David Almond), The Homecoming (by Ray Bradbury), Varjak Paw and Phoenix (by SF Said), The Fat Duck Cookbook and Historic Heston (by Heston Blumenthal), Rolling Stones: Voodoo lounge, Batman: Arkham Asylum (by Grant Morrison), and a series of works by Neil Gaiman, including Violent Cases, Signal to Noise, Coraline, The Graveyard Book, and Mr. Punch. He also contributed all the cover illustrations and design for Neil Gaiman’s Sandman series of graphic novels.

Dave wrote and illustrated Cages, which won the Harvey, Ignatz, International Alph-Art and La Pantera awards. His collection of short comics, Pictures That Tick, won the Victoria & Albert Museum Illustrated Book Of The Year Award, and many of his books are in the V&A Museum.

He has created hundreds of CD, book, and comic book covers, has created advertising campaigns for Kodak, Sony, Nike, BMW Mini, and Firetrap, and has produced conceptual design work for two of the Harry Potter films, Elton John & Bernie Taupin’s Lestat musical, and Lars von Trier’s House of Zoon.

Dave has written or cowritten, edited, designed and directed several short films and three feature films: MirrorMask, The Gospel Of Us, and Luna.

He created and performed a musical/narrative/film work called 9 Lives, which premiered at the Sydney Opera House, and has since collaborated on the multimedia works Wolf’s Child, and An Ape’s Progress.

He has exhibited in Europe, America and Japan, and is represented in private and public collections. He is currently acting as Director of Story for Heston Blumenthal’s three-star Fat Duck restaurant, finishing a collection of silent-movie-inspired paintings to be collected in a book called Nitrate, and working on Caligaro, a new graphic novel, as well as several other film and book projects. His most recent book is Black Dog: The Dreams of Paul Nash.

Credits: This episode’s music is Nothing’s Gonna Bring Me Down by David Baerwald, used with permission from the artist. The conversation was recorded at the Olympus Club in London on a pair of Blue enCORE 200 Microphones feeding into a Zoom H5 digital recorder. I recorded the intro and outro on a Heil PR-40 Dynamic Studio Recording Microphone feeding into a Cloudlifter CL-1 and a Mackie Onyx Blackjack 2×2 USB Recording Interface. All processing and editing done in Adobe Audition CC. B/W photo of Mr. McKean by me. It’s on my instagram. Drawing-board photo of Mr. McKean by Clare Haythornthwaite.

Virtual Memories Show:
The Guest List 2017

It’s time for our year-end Virtual Memories Show tradition: The Guest List! I reached out to 2017’s pod-guests and asked them about the favorite book(s) they read in the past year, as well as the books or authors they’re hoping to read in 2018! Three dozen responded with a dizzying array of books. (I participated, too!) Just in time for you to make some Hanukkah and/or Christmas purchases, The Virtual Memories Show offers up a huge list of books that you’re going to want to read! Give it a listen, and get ready to update your wish lists!

This year’s Guest List episode features selections from 36 of our recent guests (and one bonus guest)! So go give it a listen, and then visit our special Guest List page where you can find links to the books and the guests who responded.

Also, check out the 2013, 2014, 2015, and 2016 editions of The Guest List for more great book ideas!

Follow The Virtual Memories Show on iTunes, Twitter, Instagram, Facebook, Tumblr, and RSS!

About our Guests

The guests who participated in this year’s Guest List are Pete Bagge, Kathy Bidus, Sven Birkerts, RO Blechman, Kyle Cassidy, Graham Chaffee, Howard Chaykin, Joe Ciardiello, John Clute, John Crowley, John Cuneo, Ellen Datlow, Samuel R. Delany, Nicholas Delbanco, Barbara Epler, Joyce Farmer, Sarah Williams Goldhagen, Paul Gravett, Liz Hand, Vanda Krefft, Michael Meyer, Cullen Murphy, Jeff Nunokawa, Mimi Pond, Eddy Portnoy, Keiler Roberts, Martin Rowson, Matt Ruff, Ben Schwartz, Vanessa Sinclair, Ann Telnaes, Michael Tisserand, Gordon Van Gelder, Shannon Wheeler, Wallis Wilde-Menozzi, Matt Wuerker . . . and me, Gil Roth! Check out their episodes at our archives!

Credits: This episode’s music is Nothing’s Gonna Bring Me Down by David Baerwald, used with permission of the artist. The episode was recorded on a Heil PR-40 Dynamic Studio Recording Microphone feeding into a Cloudlifter CL-1 and a Mackie Onyx Blackjack 2×2 USB Recording Interface. All processing and editing done in Adobe Audition CC.

Virtual Memories Show 248:
Cullen Murphy

“The cartoonists in that community were very intent on making their own way in life with the tools they enjoyed working with, rather than being slotted into a pathway of someone else’s devising.”

This podcast has been to Hicksville and Coconino, so why not Fairfield County, CT? Cullen Murphy‘s new book, Cartoon County: My Father and His Friends in the Golden Age of Make-Believe (FSG), tells the story of Prince Valiant cartoonist John Cullen Murphy and the community of cartoonists, illustrators and comic-book artists who settled the southeastern corner of Connecticut in the ’50s and ’60s. Cullen & I talk about the confluence of factors that led to that community and his goal of preserving that golden age in this book, his realization that “cartoonist” was not a normal job for one’s dad, his own cartooning aspirations, what writing Prince Valiant with his father taught him about storytelling, how his upbringing around cartoonists affected how he worked with illustrators as a magazine editor, why his father stuck with realism and never worked in bigfoot style, and what Cartoon County taught him about himself & his family. Give it a listen! And go buy Cartoon County!

“When I was thinking of the audience for Cartoon County, I very much had my family in mind.”

Enjoy the conversation! Then check out the archives for more great episodes!

Lots of ways to follow The Virtual Memories Show! iTunes, Twitter, Instagram, Soundcloud, Facebook, Tumblr, and RSS!

About our Guest

Cullen Murphy is the editor at large at Vanity Fair and the former managing editor of The Atlantic Monthly. His books include Are We Rome?: The Fall of an Empire and the Fate of America, and God’s Jury: The Inquisition and the Making of the Modern World. For twenty-five years he collaborated with his father, the illustrator John Cullen Murphy, on the comic strip Prince Valiant. He lives in Massachusetts with his family. His new book is Cartoon County: My Father and His Friends in the Golden Age of Make-Believe.

Credits: This episode’s music is Nothing’s Gonna Bring Me Down by David Baerwald, used with permission from the artist. The conversation was recorded at the Vanity Fair offices (!) on a pair of Blue enCORE 200 Microphones feeding into a Zoom H5 digital recorder. I recorded the intro and outro on a Heil PR-40 Dynamic Studio Recording Microphone feeding into a Cloudlifter CL-1 and a Mackie Onyx Blackjack 2×2 USB Recording Interface. All processing and editing done in Adobe Audition CC. Photo of Mr. Murphy by me. It’s on my instagram.

Virtual Memories Show 243:
Martin Rowson

“The one unforgivable crime in British public life is admitting you have no sense of humor.”

“It can always get worse,” says Martin Rowson, who’s made a career out of highlighting the idiocy of politicians in his editorial cartoons. We talk about the purpose of satire, his preference for subversion over respectability, the benefits of considering himself a journalist rather than an artist, the advantages of being self-taught, the rationale for selling his original art to UKIP, his literary background and the adaptions he’s done (The Waste Land, Tristram Shandy, Gulliver’s Travels), the ones he hasn’t done (Dorian Gray, Frankenstein), and the one he’s working on now. Plus, we get into the change in his outlook when he began working in color (and when he turned 50), how to draw Trump, his disdain for modern fiction and why he killed off Martin Amis a half-dozen times in his old literary strip, and what it’s like “committing assassination without the blood”. Give it a listen!

“I used to think my job as a satirist was corrective surgery, albeit with a cudgel rather than a scalpel, but it’s not about that at all. It’s not to make our subjects become better people by pointing out their idiocies. It’s to make us feel better about them. It’s to make us laugh, to empower us to have permission to laugh.”

“‘Artists’ view illustrators and cartoonists with a kind of contempt, because it’s all they’ve got. And because we get paid regularly.”

Enjoy the conversation! Then check out the archives for more great episodes!

Lots of ways to follow The Virtual Memories Show! iTunes, Twitter, Instagram, Soundcloud, Facebook, Tumblr, and RSS!

About our Guest

Martin Rowson is a multi-award-winning cartoonist, writer and broadcaster. His work is published in The Guardian, The Daily Mirror, The Independent on Sunday, The Morning Star and has appeared in more or less every other publication you can think of, apart from The Sun. He has produced comic book adaptations of T S Eliot’s The Waste Land, Laurence Sterne’s The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman, and Jonathan Swift’s Gulliver’s Travels. Other books include, Giving Offence, F*ck: The History of the World in 65 Unfortunate Incidents and The Dog Allusion: Gods, Pets and How to be Human, an irrational atheist’s response to Richard Dawkins. His 2006 memoir Stuff: A Memoir of Death and Life, about clearing out his late parents’ house and his own adoption, was nominated for the Samuel Johnson Prize for Non-Fiction. Martin is former chair of the British Cartoonists’ Association and a former vice-president of the Zoological Society of London. He was appointed ‘Cartoonist Laureate’ of London when Ken Livingstone was Mayor. For some reason, that didn’t continue under Boris Johnson.

Credits: This episode’s music is Nothing’s Gonna Bring Me Down by David Baerwald, used with permission from the artist. The conversation was recorded at Mr. Rowson’s home on a pair of Blue enCORE 200 Microphones feeding into a Zoom H5 digital recorder. I recorded the intro and outro on a Heil PR-40 Dynamic Studio Recording Microphone feeding into a Cloudlifter CL-1 and a Mackie Onyx Blackjack 2×2 USB Recording Interface. All processing and editing done in Adobe Audition CC. Photos of Mr. Rowson & his work & desk by me. It’s on my instagram.